Causes And Effects Of Urbanization Essay

Effects Of Urbanization Essay

Urbanization and Sustainable Development
Tang 1 Iris
   We all know the urbanization rate is an index to value the development of a country. However, though urbanization provides great convenience to some individuals, it also brings about negative effects. Problems such as pollution, overcrowded and the high unemployment appear during the process of urbanization and they are hard to cope with. In face of the sequence of problems, a new way of development ----sustainable development was put forward. Just like its literal meaning, the word sustainability has something to do with continuity. It was used since 1980s and first appeared in Britain law in 1993. Sustainable development can help solve parts of the problem caused by urbanization, including environmental damage, overuse of resources, and natural disasters.
   Sustainable development can solve problems of environmental damage, or in other words, pollution. For example, water pollution is severe nowadays. Waste water was continually discharged from factories, with poisonous chemicals running with it. Considering the aim of sustainable development, we can come upon some ideas to deal with the problem. First, sewage system should be improved during the development so that drinking water can gain more purity. Furthermore, rain water can be separated from industrial and domestic water, it should go through another system so that people can harness it more effectively and properly. The emission of waste water, which contains organophosphorus pesticide, should also be restricted, for they pollute water heavily and harm not only fish and aquatic animals but also people use the polluted water. Air pollution caused by over urbanization are among the most severe problems urbanization leads to. These sorts of problems can also be solved by this means. The pollution source of air pollution is mostly considered as combustion product of fossil fuels or polluters from vehicle exhausts. Cleaner fuels are needed confronting global warming caused by excess CO2 in the air like hydrogen, which only turn into water when combusted and have better ability to provide heat. Also new kinds of energy can be developed instead of only combustion heat, like tidal energy, solar energy, etc. To avoid polluting gases, the government should appeal people to take public transport more often instead of only drive their own cars. Besides, more power station should be moved away from the city, which can less effect urban people’s air quality. Moreover, land pollution, can be solved by burn the garbage in an inhospitable place instead of only burying it, and also, solved by restricting the emission of heavy metal to the land ( like mercury, palladium, cadmium, etc). To prevent these sorts of polluters, some strategies must be taken, like limiting the discard of litter and batteries, and the waste batteries should be dealt with appropriately. As estimated, a D battery can make a piece of land of 1 square...

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The Effects of Urbanization

1773 Words8 Pages

Urbanization
Urbanization is the gradual constant increase in the population of people in urban areas or rather cities. Urbanization is mostly associated with the rural-urban migration phenomenon that takes place when people move in large numbers from rural areas into urban areas in order to seek a better life quality (R.Faridi, 2012) (Tellnes P, 2014). As much as that can be said it is the only way that the population increases, people may also move from other their own urban areas to other more urbanized areas if they chose to do so. In its initial phase, urbanization was mostly influenced by people wanting better jobs than those they had on the country side, so people moved to more modernized places as agriculture was now being less…show more content…

The downfall of urbanisation is that it cause more problems for the city as it adds to the population of the city and in most cases this increase was not planned for, and therefore leads to whole lot of development plans failing and having to change in order to try and cope with the constant increase of the population in the city (Davis, 1955). With people moving from rural settlements to urban area, in most cases they do not have enough resource to survive in the city and they forced to find alternative sources to try and get their basic needs like shelter and food, and that is why an increase in informal settlements and other illegal dwellings that get erected (R.Faridi, 2012). Urbanisation also accounts for irregular planning that takes place in city expansions.
When a city plans to have certain expansion programmes and sets the timeline for the developments to start, the problems comes in when all of this urbanisation is taking place and now all the focus has to put into trying and finding solutions and accommodations for all these people coming into the city and now the city has to make decision here and there as to how to solve this irregular expansion of the city (Davis, 1955). This when all the high rise buildings come into play as not that much land was available or not enough land was set out for residential purposes, and now this another form of trying to solve the problem before it escalates

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