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AFI and Frankfurt School of Finance & Management launch online training module for Financial Inclusion

In collaboration with the Frankfurt School of Finance & Management, the Alliance for Financial Inclusion (AFI) will be launching its first online training module, ‘Certified Expert in Financial Inclusion Policy (CEFI)’.

Participants will benefit from a world class education experience of a top-ranked business school, combined with the expertise from the world`s leading organization for financial inclusion policymakers.

Who should sign up for the course?

  • Financial regulators, policy makers, supervisors who are working on developing policies, regulations, strategies pertaining to financial inclusion
  • Management and staff of financial service providers, both banks and non-banks, and financial inclusion professionals who need to be aware of the regulatory aspects to help design and deliver financial services that promotes financial inclusion
  • Staff of AFI Member Institutions who are new to financial inclusion or interested to make a career change in financial inclusion
  • AFI member institutions which are setting up new units specialising in financial inclusion
  • AFI Member institutions which are developing a comprehensive financial inclusion strategy
  • AFI PPD partners who want to understand the policy perspective of financial inclusion

What is the course content?

This course provides an understanding of the designing and implementation of regulatory frameworks that help promote financial inclusion. The seven units are as follows:

Unit 1Balancing Inclusion, Integrity and Stability
Unit 2Consumer Empowerment and Market Conduct
Unit 3Financial Inclusion Strategies
Unit 4Measuring Financial Inclusion
Unit 5Financing Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises
Unit 6Microcredit, Microsavings and Microinsurance
Unit 7Digital Financial Services

For more details on each unit, click HERE

What is unique about the course?

This is the first online course on financial inclusion, which has a very clear focus on the policy aspects of financial inclusion. The course will help develop skills to draft and analyse policies and to design strategies that are most relevant to emerging economies.

What are the benefits of the course?

  • The structure is flexible and available online. Participants will be able to complete the course within six months at their own convenience
  • Upon completion, participants will receive certification from a world class educational institution
  • Participants will receive input from technical experts and will learn from their peers through the discussion forum
  • The course can be completed while on a full-time job

How much does it cost?

The course is priced at Euro 1300. Registrations received before 15 January, 2018 are eligible for an early bird discount. With an early bird discount, the pricing of the course is Euro 1100. However, paid up AFI member institutions enjoy a further discount of Euro 300.

Course feesAFI member institutionsNon-member institutions
Pricing before January 15, 2018EUR 1,100EUR 1,100
Pricing after January 15, 2018EUR 1,300EUR 1,300

Additional discount for paid up AFI member institutions only

EUR 800Not applicable
Exam feeEUR 50EUR 50

The assignments at the end of each module are to be taken online. The final examination is a sit-down exam. Please view the exam locations here to find an examination center most convenient to you. You would have to arrange to go for the examination on your own and pay the Euro 50 exam fee to the host of the examination center.

How to register?

Register directly through the website of Frankfurt School of Finance & Management HERE

Please note that discounts can only be granted if participants chose “bank transfer” as payment option. Frankfurt School can cater for PayPal or credit card payment at a later stage upon request.

When does the course begin and end?

The next intake begins in March 2018 and is required to be completed within six months.  The programme structure is flexible and can be self-paced. In total, a workload of 150 hours is expected, which on average 5-7 hours per week of work effort during the six months period (self-study, online lectures, reading, final exam preparation).

How are the assessments completed?

Each unit ends with an online test which will consist of multiple choice questions. Participants are required to pass these tests in order to get access to the subsequent module. Participants will also have to complete relevant assignments and take an offline final written exam. The final exam can be taken through a network of partner institutions across the world on payment of €50 final exam fee to the institution.

What certification is given on completion of the course?

Upon successful completion of the exam Frankfurt School will issue a certificate. With the certificate, participants earn 6 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System), which can get recognized easily by the university of studies, given the course fits into the curriculum. If the exam is not taken or failed but participants have completed the course work, a confirmation of course completion can be issued by Frankfurt School on request.

Recognition in Frankfurt School’s Online Master of Leadership in Development Finance

The CEFI is an integral part of Frankfurt School’s Online Master of Leadership in Development Finance. As such, a CEFI Alumni taking the Online Master gets the CEFI recognized both for the syllabus and for the tuition fees.

Click HERE to download the course brochure. Please get in touch with us at Capacity.Building@afi-global.org if you have any questions.

We invite you to join the course to become a certified expert in financial inclusion!

Use your concept map or plan

Write your assignment using your map or plan to guide you.  As you write, you may well get new ideas or think about ideas in slightly different ways.  This is fine, but check back to your map or plan to evaluate whether that idea fits well into the plan or the paragraph that you are writing at the time. Consider:  In which paragraph does it best fit?  How does it link to the ideas you have already discussed?

Paragraph planning

For every paragraph, think about the main idea that you want to communicate in that paragraph and write a clear topic sentence which tells the reader what you are going to talk about. A main idea is more than a piece of content that you found while you were researching, it is often a point that you want to make about the information that you are discussing.  Consider how you are going to discuss that idea (what is the paragraph plan). For example, are you: listing a number of ideas, comparing and contrasting the views of different authors, describing problems and solutions, or describing causes and effects?

Use linking words throughout the paragraph. For example:

  • List paragraphs should include words like: similarly, additionally, next, another example, as well, furthermore, another, firstly, secondly, thirdly, finally, and so on.
  • Cause and effect paragraphs should include words like: consequently, as a result, therefore, outcomes included, results indicated, and so on.
  • Compare and contrast paragraphs should include words like: on the other hand, by contrast, similarly, in a similar way, conversely, alternatively, and so on.
  • Problem solution paragraphs should include words like: outcomes included, identified problems included, other concerns were overcome by, and so on.

Note:
Some paragraphs can include two plans, for example a list of problems and solutions.  While this is fine, it is often clearer to include one plan per paragraph.  

Linking paragraphs:

Look at your plan or map and decide on the key concepts that link the different sections of your work.  Is there an idea that keeps recurring in different sections?  This could be a theme that you can use to link ideas between paragraphs.  Try using linking words (outlined above) to signal to your reader whether you are talking about similar ideas, whether you are comparing and contrasting, and so on.  The direction that your thinking is taking in the essay should be very clear to your reader.  Linking words will help you to make this direction obvious.

Different parts of the essay:

While different types of essays have different requirements for different parts of the essay, it is probably worth thinking about some general principles for writing introductions, body paragraphs and conclusions.  Always check the type of assignment that you are being asked to produce and consider what would be the most appropriate way to structure that type of writing. 

Remember that in most (not all) writing tasks, especially short tasks (1,000 to 2,000 words), you will not write headings such as introduction and conclusion.  Never use the heading ‘body’.

Writing an introduction:

Introductions need to provide general information about the topic. Typically they include:

  • Background, context or a general orientation to the topic so that the reader has a general understanding of the area you are discussing.
  • An outline of issues that will and will not be discussed in the essay (this does not have to be a detailed list of the ideas that you will discuss).  An outline should be a general overview of the areas that you will explore.
  • A thesis or main idea which is your response to the question.  

Here is an example of an introduction:

It is often a good idea to use some of the words from the question in the introduction to indicate that you are on track with the topic.  Do not simply recount the question word for word. 

Writing the body:

  • Each paragraph should make a point which should be linked to your outline and thesis statement.
  • The most important consideration in the body paragraphs is the argument that you want to develop in response to the topic. This argument is developed by making and linking points in and between paragraphs.

Try structuring paragraphs like this:

  • Topic sentence: open the paragraph by making a point 
  • Supporting sentences: support the point with references and research
  • Conclusive sentence: close the paragraph by linking back to the point you made to open the paragraph and linking this to your thesis statement.

Here is an example of a body paragraph from the essay about education and globalisation:

As you write the body, make sure that you have strong links between the main ideas in each of the paragraphs.

Writing the conclusion:

This is usually structured as follows:

  • Describe in general terms the most important points made or the most important linkage of ideas
  • Do not include new information, therefore it does not usually contain references
  • End with a comment, a resolution, or a suggestion for issues that may be addressed in future research on the topic.

Here is an example conclusion from the essay on education:

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