60 Minutes Sports Nfl Refs Assignments

BALTIMORE Referee Gene Steratore turned on his microphone to greet the captains of the Cleveland Browns and Baltimore Ravens for the pre-game coin toss.

"Good evening, men," Steratore said. "It's good to be back."

The stadium erupted in a roar.

Yes, the real refs are back. Official harmony is restored to the NFL.

Steratore and his seven-man crew donned their familiar stripes for the first game of Week 4 after three weeks of replacement officials created moments of chaos throughout the league. The officials ran a mostly smooth and efficient game Thursday night -- and were inevitably serenaded with a hearty round of boos for one call that went against the home team -- but there were no headline-making gaffes in the Ravens' 23-16 win over the Browns.

Intriguingly, the first game with the regular officials ended in a similar manner as the last game with the replacements. A 24-yard desperation pass on the last play gave the Seattle Seahawks a disputed 14-12 win over the Green Bay Packers on Monday night, while Brandon Weeden's 18-yard pass sailed out of the end zone -- with no controversy -- as time expired Thursday.

"You know, we always pride ourselves in being a face without a name," Steratore, a 10-year league veteran, told The Associated Press about an hour before kickoff. "This will be a little different, but I don't expect it to last too long. And that's the goal -- is that we can let them get through that portion of this. It's happy to be back, it's happy to be appreciated. But then as soon as the game starts, it's happy to disappear again and let the entertainers entertain."

Everyone on all sides was happy to see the familiar faces they usually love to hate, and the welcome-back love began early. About an hour before kickoff, the officials walked on the field and heard cheers from the early arrivals. A few minutes later, Steratore was shaking hands with Browns coach Pat Shurmur near midfield and getting a hug from Ravens face-of-the-franchise Ray Lewis at the 30-yard line.

Later, when the crew returned, they walked on the field they received a standing ovation and doffed their caps to the crowd. As CBSSports.colm blogger Ryan Wilson put it, "Never in the history of sports has that happened."

One fan held up a sign that read: "Finally! We get to yell at real refs! Welcome back!"

"The other refs just made dumb calls," said Jessie Riley, a 15-year-old fan wearing an Ed Reed jersey. "I couldn't stand them. Now we won't get robbed; everything will be fair -- hopefully."

A lockout of the league's regular officials ended late Wednesday, two days after the "Monday Night Football" finish brought debate over the use of the replacements to a fevered pitch nationwide. Commissioner Roger Goodell acknowledged the Seahawks-Packers game "may have pushed the parties further along" in the talks.

"Obviously, when you go through something like this it is painful for everybody," Goodell said. "Most importantly, it is painful for our fans. We are sorry to have to put our fans through that, but it is something that in the short term you sometimes have to do to make sure you get the right kind of deal for the long term and make sure you continue to grow the game."

The deal is only tentative -- it must be ratified by 51 percent of the union's 121 members in a vote scheduled for Friday and Saturday in Dallas -- but both sides nevertheless went forward with the plan to have the regulars back for Thursday's game.

So Steratore hustled to Baltimore, making the 3-1/2 hour drive Thursday morning from his home in the Pittsburgh area. He's usually in place the day before a game, but none of his regular pregame meetings had to be changed because the Browns-Ravens game was at night.

"Very elated to be back," he said. "It feels like being back home."

Steratore, who is a basketball official in the Big East Conference among others, also was fully aware he would be jeered the first time he makes a questionable call -- just like always.

"Without a question," he said. "I've been yelled at by my own children many times, so this won't be any different."

Sure enough, the same fans that cheered the coin toss let out a full chorus of boos when line judge Jeff Seeman toss his yellow flag some 20 yards to whistle Baltimore safety Bernard Pollard for a personal foul in the third quarter. Replays showed it was a good call: Pollard led with his helmet to make contact with a defenseless receiver, costing the Ravens 15 yards in a drive that led to a field goal for the Browns.

Less clear was Seeman's fourth-quarter holding call on Ravens left tackle Michael Oher, who was restrained by a teammate while vociferously protesting his innocence. Replays appeared to show Oher had a good case for himself.

Steratore's crew nearly made a misstep in the first quarter, incorrectly spotting the ball by 2 yards after a misapplication of the rules following a holding call on the Browns. But two members of the crew caught the mistake and notified the referee before the next snap. A brief huddle ensued, and the ball was moved to its correct spot.

The crew made it clear it wouldn't tolerate the extra shoving and yelling after the whistle that had been frequently permitted by the replacements. Offsetting personal fouls were called on Cleveland's Johnson Bademosi and Baltimore's James Ihedigbo for extracurricular roughness on a punt return in the first quarter, and the Browns bench was flagged for unsportsmanlike conduct after an intentional grounding call against Weeden in the fourth quarter. Again, replays appeared to validate the call.

Steratore had to make a trip to the replay monitor for the same play to review a turnover. The replays clearly showed that Cleveland's Joshua Cribbs had fumbled, so Steratore confirmed the ruling on the field. Cribbs had his helmet knocked off and was injured on the play, creating the game's only lengthy delay.

There were 18 penalties called in the game, mostly the familiar calls for holding and false start. There were two rare -- and indisputable -- whistles for fair catch interference on punt returns, and a hands-to-the-face call on Baltimore's Mitchell Schwartz was so obvious that it drew three flags.

Steratore and his crew set up shop in the designated "Officials Locker Room" in the bowels of the stadium. He emerged about 2-1/2 hours before kickoff to talk briefly to a stadium official about the wireless on-field microphone the referee wears. He later held a regular pregame meeting with stadium crew, telling them to "make sure we run this thing as smoothly" as they had in his previous visits to Baltimore.

Steratore then walked down the tunnel and onto the field, pacing the sidelines with little fanfare because he was still wearing his coat and tie.

The lockout ended after marathon negotiations produced an eight-year agreement to end the lockout that began in June. However, for the Packers, Redskins, Lions and other teams who voiced their displeasure with calls that might have swayed games, the agreement doesn't change their records.

The commissioner said he watched Monday night's frenetic Packers-Seahawks finish at home.

"You never want to see a game end like that," he said.

The new agreement will improve officiating in the future, Goodell asserted, reducing mistakes like those made Monday and making the strains of the last three weeks worthwhile.

Goodell acknowledged "you're always worried" about the perception of the league.

"Obviously, this has gotten a lot of attention," he said. "It hasn't been positive, and it's something that you have to fight through and get to the long term. ... We always are going to have to work harder to make sure we get people's trust and confidence in us."

The dispute even made its way to the campaign trail, with President Barack Obama's spokesman, Jay Carney, calling Thursday "a great day for America."

"The president's very pleased that the two sides have come together," Carney said.

(The Nation) Although anathema to NFL fans across the country, we should recognize that sometimes a punter shall lead us. It was Minnesota Viking's punter Chris Kluwe who took to Twitter and said what has been so painfully obvious through three weeks of the National Football League's pre-season: "The NFL really needs to kiss and make up with the refs. These replacements are horrible. Frankly, it's kind of embarrassing."

Kluwe is correct. It is embarrassing. It's embarrassing that replacement referees with highlights on their resumes like working for the Lingerie Football League have been bungling calls throughout the pre-season. This has included screwing up the small detail of which teams were actually on the field. It's embarrassing that in a league where any play could be the last time someone walks without a limp or concussion, these incompetents are in charge of monitoring the health and safety of players. It's embarrassing that members of the NFL Players Association, who are part of the AFL-CIO, will, once on the field, be under the authority of scabs.

It's also bewildering. Consider the multibillion-dollar entity that is the National Football League. Then consider that NFL referees are 119 part-time employees who make $8,000 a week. As Jeff MacGregorcalculated at espn.com, at a cost of $50 million a year -- less than one percent of total revenue -- NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell could hire 200 full-time officials at $250,000 a year. Conversely, if Goodell gets everything he wants from the referees union and he doesn't have to spend too much in legal fees, it works out to league-wide savings of just $62,000 per team.

Locking them out is like using an Uzi on a field mouse. The question once again is why? Why has NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, taken such a hard line? After a year defined by the tragic suicides of former players suffering from post-concussion syndrome and a looming lawsuit brought by 2000 former players contending that the NFL didn't take their safety seriously, why would they engage in such naked contempt for the well-being of players and the integrity of their game? Simply put, because they can.

The NFL clearly believes with no small amount of justification that they can do this because no one will care. As NFL VP Ray Anderson said, perhaps while twirling his mustache, "You've never paid for an NFL ticket to watch someone officiate a game."

The only way to understand why there is a lockout of NFL Referees is to understand who is doing the locking out. It's not Roger Goodell, who for all the fawning media profiles, is little more than an exceptionally well-paid executive "flak-catcher." It's the people he represents. NFL teams are no longer family businesses and owners are no longer kindly patriarchs. They comprise the right-wing edge of America's super-rich. NFL owners don't travel in the same circles as Mitt Romney. They travel in the circles of those who underwrite Mitt Romney's campaign.

For these twenty-first-century Masters of the Universe, the lockout, once a near-unthinkable labor-management tactic, has become the weapon of choice when dealing with what's left of the trade union movement. Since 2010, the number of lockouts annually in the US has doubled. A lockout gives employers the power to strip workers of their salaries, bring in temporary replacements and then simply wait until the day locked out workers eat through their meager savings and then force them back on the conditions of outlandish demands. It's a management tactic that has hammered thousands of families from middle class security to destitution.

The owners have decided NFL referees need to be locked out because like the scorpion who stings, that's simply what they do. Look at the demands being made of the referees: NFL owners want them to stop being part-time labor and instead work full-time for the league. Sounds great, except they want the refs to eliminate their other sources of income while taking a 16 percent cut in salary. They also want to eliminate their pensions and replace them with 401k plans tied to the stock market. Put simply, the owners line is less pay, less benefits, and if you don't like it we're locking the doors.

"They told us if we didn't take what was on the table, they would cut it more and they have. They have disguised regressive bargaining as trying to improve officiating overall and to give people more time off," said NFL Referee's Association lead negotiator Mike Arnold. "They keep saying in the media that they were willing, able, and ready to negotiate, but they kept telling us they weren't interested in discussing our proposal and if the deal was going to settle it was going to settle on their terms."

The referees and the NFL Players Association both seem to be keeping any joint strategy under wraps. "We'll see what the decision is as we get closer to [opening] day. Hopefully, they can figure this out in an amicable way as soon as possible. I'm not sure what the decision is going to be from the Players Association when that day comes," NFLPA president Domonique Foxworth told "PFT Live."

Named one of UTNE Reader's "50 Visionaries Who Are Changing Our World," Dave Zirin is the sports editor for The Nation magazine. Mike Elk is a labor journalist and third-generation union organizer based in Washington, D.C. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the authors.

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