Cover Letter Double Spaced Or Single Spaced Words

Example Business Letter Formats

When creating business letters, use 8 ½" by 11" unlined paper. Although 24-pound paper with 100+ brightness is a little more expensive, it will make a better impression than everyday copy paper. Use 1" margins on all four sides. Use a serif font such as Times Roman (12 point) or Georgia (11 point). A business letter should be single-spaced and, if possible, typed on a computer. Print the letter on only one side of the paper. Fold the letter horizontally into thirds. Mail the letter in a No. 10 security envelope (4 1/8" by 9 ½").

There are several business letter formats, but all of them can be subdivided into two basic groups: the block format and various indented formats. Although the block format is somewhat more common, (perhaps because it is easier), either one is acceptable. All conventional formats contain the same features:

1. Return address of the letter writer.
1600 Main Street
Springfield, Kansas 12345


2. The date of the letter.
This is usually typed in one of two ways:

(Begin with the day, no comma) 15 January 2015

  or

(Begin with the month; use a comma) December 1, 2015

3. Complete name, title, and address of the recipient.

Use "Mr." for a male recipient. If you do not know how a female recipient prefers to be addressed, it is best to use "Ms."

Ms. Anna Brown, Chair
Department of Linguistics
Right State University
1415 University Drive
Felicity, OH 45434

4. Salutation with a colon.

Dear Ms. Brown:

5. Body of the letter.

It is best to keep an initial business letter short. Business people are busy and do not have time to read long letters! In a one-page letter, you will usually only need three or four paragraphs, single spaced. Use a double space in between paragraphs. See examples that follow.

The easiest way to write the body of the business letter is to use a prewritten business letter.

6. Closing.

The most common closing is "Sincerely." Follow this with a comma. Skip four single lines after the closing and type your name. Sign your name in the space above your name.

Sincerely,



Jonathan Wilson


7. Enclosure.

If you are enclosing additional information with your letter such as a resume or a curriculum vitae, skip two single lines after your typed name and type "Enclosure" or "Enclosures." If you use the plural, you have the option of stating the number of enclosures in parentheses.

Enclosures (2)

Block Format

Type every line flush with the left margin (begin at top margin)

1600 Main Street
Springfield, Kansas 12345


(four single spaces)

December 1, 2013

(double space)

Ms. Anna Brown, Chair
Department of Linguistics
Right State University
1415 University Drive
Felicity, OH 45435

(double space)

Dear Ms. Brown:

(double space)

I want you to know you have an exceptional employee, Jane Doe, in your support division. Her calm, patient manner was a great help to me when my frustration was at an all-time high. Her knowledge of the software and her remarkable problem-solving abilities are rare indeed. If the quality of a firm's employees is an indication of future success, then Doe Corporation has a very bright future.

(double space)

Sincerely,

(four single spaces)

[Signature]


John Doe

(double space)

Enclosure

Indented Format

Indent your return address, the closing, your typed name, and the optional enclosure to the approximate center of the page (position 4.25" to 4.5"). Begin at top margin:

1600 Main Street
Springfield, Kansas 12345

(four single spaces)


December 1, 2013

(double space)


Ms. Anna Brown, Chair
Department of Linguistics
Right State University
1415 University Drive
Felicity, OH 45435

(double space)

Dear Ms. Brown:

(double space)

I am writing to thank you for the training seminar you arranged, and to especially thank you for sending Mr. Doe to be our primary instructor. He did his homework well, and was more aware of our needs than any of our previous instructors. We appreciate the time he took to study samples of our work in advance so his comments were immediately applicable. We would welcome his instruction again. Please convey our thanks to Mr. Doe.

(double space)

Sincerely,

(four single spaces)

[Signature]


John Doe

(double space)

Enclosure

Indented Format: Example 2

Indent your return address, the closing, your typed name, and the optional enclosure to the approximate center of the page (position 4.25" to 4.5"). Additionally, indent each paragraph approximately five spaces. Begin at top margin.

1600 Main Street
Springfield, Kansas 12345

(four single spaces)


December 1, 2013

(double space)


Ms. Anna Brown, Chair
Department of Linguistics
Right State University
1415 University Drive
Felicity, OH 45435

(double space)

Dear Ms. Brown:

(double space)

     As manager of our computer department, I commend your employee, John Doe, for the prompt and courteous service he gave us last week. He determined our cable needs and produced a fair written estimate very quickly. Once he started the work, he stayed on location until he had installed all additional computers. You can be certain that we shall ask for him personally to serve our future needs.

(double space)

Sincerely,

(four single spaces)

[Signature]


John Doe

(double space)

Enclosure

Your resume is your first chance to make a good impression on a prospective employer. How your resume is set up can make the difference between an employer contacting you for an interview or dropping your resume in the trash bin. It's easy to use a generic template when writing your resume, but it may not give you correct spacing or formatting. By following a few simple suggestions you can create an easy to read resume that highlights your skills and work experience.

Page Layout

Ideally your resume should be one page long. Resumes longer than that are tedious for employers to review and you also run the risk that a page may be lost in transmission or separated from the rest of your resume. Keep margins between 1/2 to 1 inch wide all the way around the page. Margins that are smaller make your resume appear crowded. Your contact information and name should appear at the top of your resume. Put your name on one line and contact information on a single line underneath. Typing your address, telephone and email address into one line creates a streamlined look and saves space on your resume. You can separate the address, telephone and email using solid dots, similar to bullets.

Content

Your resume should contain all of the information about you pertinent to your ability to do the job that you are applying for. The content of your resume is broken up into sections for easy readability and comprehension. Sections to include are work history or experience, skills and education. The information in each section should be to the point and outline the things in your experience that meet the requirements of the position. Avoid listing superfluous items such as obvious computer skills or positions held more than ten years ago. Most employers request work history for between 5-10 years.

Spacing

The entire resume should be in a single-spaced format. Include a blank space between sections for easy readability. If you have space to spare on your resume you may also consider placing one space or half a space between section headings and content. If you find that your resume exceeds one page by a small amount, consider changing the font or size to improve spacing and make your resume easier to read. The smallest font that you should use on your resume is 10 point. Different fronts also increase or decrease the size of the letters. An example is that Arial is larger than Times New Roman. You also may want to put items such as education and skills lists into columns to save space.

Order of Sections

How you present the information in your resume is almost as important as the content. You have to make sure that your resume is easy to read and highlights the most relevant information on your resume. Basic sections include skills, work experience and education. Depending on the position you're applying for and your history, you may also want to include a section on awards or professional affiliations after your education. There are many different ways that you can order the sections on your resume, but keep in mind that the order dictates how the employer interprets the information. Placing the skills section at the top of your resume draws the employer's attention to your accomplishments. Following skills with work experience reinforces the information in the previous section. Place your education after your work experience. This order takes the employer's attention from what you can do, to how you earned your skills and follows with what education and professional accolades you've earned.

About the Author

Residing in Los Angeles, Kristin Swain has been a professional writer since 2008. Her experience includes finance, travel, marketing and television. Swain holds a Bachelor of Arts in communication from Georgia State University.

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